53.4909˚N
6.0163˚W
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The Baring Family

The Baring Family

Lambay Island has been in the hands of the Baring family since 1904. Today Lambay Island is owned by Alexander Baring, the seventh Baron Revelstoke. Alex lives a quiet life with his family (along with the puffins and wallabies) on this unique island paradise just three miles off the coast of Dublin.

But let’s take you back to the beginning…

Cecil Baring and Lambay Island

Cecil Baring, who would later become the third Baron Revelstoke, worked at the New York branch of the family banking business in the latter years of the 19th century. He developed a great fascination in natural history and travelled extensively in pursuit of this interest.

In 1902, Cecil Baring eloped with New Yorker Maude Lorillard, the daughter of American tobacco magnate, Pierre Lorillard. Eighteen months after their marriage, and while travelling in Europe to escape the gossipers of high society, Cecil saw an advertisement in The Field that read “Island for Sale”. He bought Lambay Island in 1904 for the princely sum of £5,250. This price translates to £607,838.71 today!

Baring Family Characters

Many of the Baring family members were extraordinary, often eccentric, characters and the island’s legendary soirees were often the talk of the mainland.

Rupert, the fourth Lord Revelstoke, who died in 1994, was especially colourful. He lived on Lambay Island for six decades and passed the time thereby writing doggerel. He also cared for the castle garden, and often spent the early hours of the morning playing chess.

The sixth Lord Revelstoke (Alexander’s father), James Cecil Baring, learned to fly Vampire jets in the RAF and later, as a member of the prestigious Tiger Club, made a name for himself as a daredevil racing and aerobatics pilot. He built the landing strip on Lambay and was the first to land an aircraft on the island. In the mid-60s he purchased and ran Regent Sound Studios in London, where the Rolling Stones made their first LP, and Jimi Hendrix pitched up to cut his first disc.

Now that you’ve met the Barings, why not get better acquainted with the Maison Camus?

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Maison Camus

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